John Calvert Dies At 102; Stage Magician Was Also In Movies

$35,000 Prima Cinema Player brings movies home as soon as they hit theaters (eyes-on)

Prima Cinema

Among the stars he counted as friends were Cary Grant, Danny Kaye and Gary Cooper. His magic shows were often humorous and usually involved sequences such as firing a woman from a cannon and sawing volunteers with a buzz saw. His wife, Tammy, sometimes served as his onstage assistant. In his heyday during the ’40s and ’50s, Calvert performed regularly in Hollywood to star-filled audiences. He also brought his acts to Las Vegas and Broadway. Known for his robust physical presence, Calvert often flew his own airplanes and sailed the world aboard his yacht. Calvert managed to parlay his stage success to the big screen, appearing in a handful of movies. His most famous role was as the detective Michael Watling, better known as the Falcon, in 1948’s “Devil’s Cargo” and two more movies. He also worked as a Hollywood stuntman, and his hands stood in for Clark Gable’s in a card-playing scene in the 1941 movie “Honky Tonk.” As a technical advisor on “The Silver Chalice” in 1954, he taught Jack Palance the tricks of the trade for the role of a magician. In 1956, he produced, wrote, directed and starred in “Dark Venture,” an adventure tale about a reporter in Africa. Calvert was born in 1911 in New Trenton, Ind. When he was 8, his father took him to see magician Howard Thurston in Cincinnati. The young Calvert was smitten and started performing for friends almost immediately after. His career took off when an agent spotted him during a performance he gave while attending college. Calvert remained active well into his later years, traveling the country with his magic acts and entertaining audiences with a mixture of charm and storytelling panache.

Mac Miller – Watching Movies With The Sound Off – Album Review | SIC ILL (Video)

Mac Miller - Watching Movies With The Sound Off - Album Review | SIC ILL

Prima Cinema has an answer, with the minor requirement of $35,000 (and a few other details) to get your home theater ready for first-run movies. Just as we’d heard when it first popped up a couple of years ago , that large setup fee buys the Cinema Player, a rack-mountable box loaded with a 2TB hard drive and enough DRM to keep the studios happy, plus a wired fingerprint reader used to ensure the owner’s identity. Movies download automatically to its hard drive in the background so they’re already there when the owner chooses to unlock them for viewing. That privilege costs $500 ($600 for 3D), good for one showing within 24 hours. Check after the break for more of our impressions after a quick preview at Prima’s CEDIA 2013 booth, then prep your black card for the pricey purchase. We saw a bit of Ron Howard’s new flick, Rush, a movie that popped up on Prima’s systems last week even before it was available at most theaters nationwide. The movies play in 1080p/24 and are encoded in “higher than Blu-ray quality” with lossless PCM or Dolby TrueHD audio. In our brief viewing it certainly seemed on-par with a theater experience, although at this price we’d hope a 4K option arrives sooner rather than later. Of course, other than the steep entry fee there are a few other hurdles to jump before you can obtain one of these. It’s only for home use in theaters that seat fewer than 25 people, with a check of the purchaser’s background to weed out pirates, and the box requires a public static IP to make sure it stays where it’s registered. Past that process, once it’s all set up owners enjoy the kind of access usually restricted to the well-connected studio elite, screening the newest flicks at their leisure. Or, almost at their leisure, because while there’s a pause button and a five minute skip, the usual playback controls aren’t present here. The other fly in the ointment is a relatively short list of available titles. Universal is an investor and its movies are among those listed, with selections also popping up from others like Millennium Films. Currently viewable options include movies like Rush, Riddick, Kick-Ass 2, The World’s End, Despicable Me 2 and 2 Guns.

Notable deaths of 2013

S.D.S. has a fun cartoony sounding beat, Mac rides the beat pretty good. Bird Call is another uptempo tracks, its a track about ladies and success. Matches features Ab-Soul , Mac Miller does one of his best verses, talking about how he had his first business at 18. He continues his tongue twisting flow from Matches on the next track I am who I am. Objects in the Mirror is a for the ladies track, Mac does a lit a bit of harmonizing on here, no autotune though. Red Dot Music features Action Bronson who talks about tour life, money, how he’s rapping for his son and daughter. Gees sounds like a neptunes production, experimental hip hop track, i like high pitch effect he uses on the chorus. On both the title track Watching Movies and Suplexes Inside of Complexes and DUplexes Mac uses more of his lyrical skills. REMember is a introspective track he talks about having strength in hard times. Someone Like You might have the best instrumental on the track, it’s a slow jazzy track, sounds like he was aiming for something a little mainstream. Aquarium is another track where Mac just goes in killing the track.